If my son violated his probation (convicted of property damage) but has not turned himself in to the police and has a warrant, should I contact a lawyer?

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If my son violated his probation (convicted of property damage) but has not turned himself in to the police and has a warrant, should I contact a lawyer?

I know that he has to turn himself in; is it too late for a lawyer? I’m afraid he will be incarcerated. I think the punishment is severe for property damage, all involved were minors except for my son. I need advise on what to do and can we go back to court to reverse the decision?

Asked on January 20, 2016 under Criminal Law, Minnesota

Answers:

B.H.F., Member, Texas State Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 5 years ago | Contributor

You have a couple of different issues/concerns.
With regard to obtaining an attorney... it really doesn't hurt to reach out to an attorney to help facilitate a better plea deal and to help him turn himself in.  Many attorneys can arrange it such that he can book in and out the same day... depending on the bond. 
With regard to the court decision... you need to take your son's paperwork to an appellate attorney and let them review it to see if any appeallate or writ options are still available to your son.  Most time limits expire in 30-60 days after a judgment is entered... however, some exceptions may apply.  In the off chance that one of these exceptions may apply, the sooner your son invokes them, the better.
When looking for an attorney, if you can find one that understands trial and appellate work, that would be helpful so that you don't have to pay for two attorneys.  However, keep in mind that many criminal attorneys only do trial work.  This means that you need to specifically ask if they do appellate work as well.


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