if my son is in college and next year is moving off campus with 9 other students, is there is any way he can he protect himself from liability if/when there are parties with underage drinking?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

if my son is in college and next year is moving off campus with 9 other students, is there is any way he can he protect himself from liability if/when there are parties with underage drinking?

He is 20 and will turn 21 during his junior year. Even if he personally refuses to serve minors, there is no way he can control the behavior of his 9 roommates in a party situation. Will he be liable just by being there/living there? Would liability fall on those that buy and serve the alcohol?

Asked on April 18, 2013 under Personal Injury, Wisconsin

Answers:

MD, Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

This is a bad situation waiting to happen. As a co-tenant of this property, he is equally responsible for the goings on and dangers therein. Therefore, even if he was not there or was there but did not provide or serve alcohol to minors, it would be very difficult and expensive to a) prove his innonence and b) get this matter expunged from his record.

The best approach is to sit down as a family with the local prosecutor's office and see if that office could provide you information on possible outcomes. The bottom line is you do not want your son to be in a position to have to fight to clear his record and not impact his schooling.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption