Should I speak to the police about an investigation regarding a stolen TV set?

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Should I speak to the police about an investigation regarding a stolen TV set?

My sister works overnight as a front desk clerk for a hotel. Last night, the police contacted me and informed me that there was a TV missing from one of the rooms. They said that my sister said she put me in that room the night it came up missing. There is nothing but her word actually linking me to even being in the hotel. It is also known that she allows anyone to stay at the hotel and swim all night, etc. The policeman said that he wanted me to come talk to him or he would get a warrant for my arrest. I don’t know what they can and cannot do based on someone’s word. I know there is no evidence that would without any question prove that I took a television because I didn’t. I need to speak to someone on the phone.

Asked on July 23, 2011 West Virginia

Answers:

MD, Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

If you didn't do it, make the police obtain a search warrant of your home and or vehicle and a warrant for your arrest. Your role in the meantime is to obtain counsel or at least consult with counsel. What they have to go on right now is hearsay and hearsay without more proof is not sufficient to equate to probable cause. If you have information that your sister is less than stellar when it comes to security or proper hotel admittance procedures, this is something you need to inform the police about but do so under the advice and guidance of counsel if you so choose. You could also consider waiting for the police to obtain such warrant before you consult with counsel if you do not wish to bear the expense at the moment.


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