What to do about outstanding warrants if the case has been dropped?

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What to do about outstanding warrants if the case has been dropped?

My sister had a warrant issued for her arrest as a runaway. She is now over the age and her mother has 2 different letters – 1 from the sheriff department and 1 from the county attorney office for juveniles saying that the case has been dropped. My sister lives in a different county and has to get transferred to a different county and go to court for charges that were dropped. She was arrested 3 days ago but won’t be in court until the 24th. What are her options? The county that issued the warrant doesn’t even have a record of the warrant because it was dropped, yet everyone is pointing fingers saying that they can’t help.

Asked on April 15, 2013 under Criminal Law, Arizona

Answers:

Tricia Dwyer / Tricia Dwyer Esq & Associates PLLC

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

Hello. Based on the sketchy information you described, your sister needs an attorney to assist and advise her.  The attorney will study and consider all of the information and facts.  In my experience, a family member or other loved one may contact me regarding a person who is jailed and ask that I go to the jail to speak with the person who is incarcerated and to provide appropriate legal advice. Attorneys typically may go to the jail to meet with their clients seven days of the week.  All the best.


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