What to do if my mom co-signed for a car for me 6 years and I just paid it off but now she doesn’t want to give me the title?

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What to do if my mom co-signed for a car for me 6 years and I just paid it off but now she doesn’t want to give me the title?

Asked on November 25, 2011 under Business Law, Georgia

Answers:

L.P., Member, Pennsylvania and New Jersey Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

This answerwill vary depending on the state in which you reside.  Each state has their own set of rules for handling payoff of motor vehicle loans.  Generally, once the loan has been paid off, the lien holder (the bank carrying the loan), will notify your state’s Department of Motor Vehicles to notify them that the loan has been paid off.  Depending on the state, they may send the paperwork by regular mail or electronically, and depending on their means of communication could delay the process of acquiring the title.  Some states will send the title automatically once they have received notification that the loan has been fully paid.  Other states will cause a delay and wait until the last check has cleared before sending you paperwork for the title. 

Since you were a co-signer on the loan, you should be able to have a copy of the title mailed to you.  The contact information for receiving the title can be found on your state’s Department of Motor Vehicle website. 

If you still have problems obtaining the title from the co-signer, you may be able to file a claim in small claims court to demonstrate that you are the person who made the payments for the vehicle and also that the loan has been paid off.  Be sure to have all of your checks and necessary paperwork that supports your position that you have been the responsible party for payment of the vehicle.

Lastly, if you have further questions, you should contact an attorney in your area that handles general litigation matters. 

 


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