How to stop alimony due to financial hardship?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

How to stop alimony due to financial hardship?

My live-in boyfriend has to pay alimony to his ex-wife. We have been it for about 16 years now. Now, we are in dire financial straights. We can’t afford to pay our bills. Both of us work on commission-based, self-employed jobs. I am 58 and he’s 61. We only have 1 more month of expenses paid without anything coming in right now. And even if we make some commissions, it will be months before we are paid. We have exhausted all of our credit, in fact both of us have gone bankrupt. We have borrowed from family’ we can’t borrow anymore. We will probably have to move in with my boyfriend’s sister. Is there any way we can stop paying her alimony until we get on our feet again?

Asked on October 11, 2012 under Family Law, Florida

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

The way to reduce the monthly amount of alimony that is being paid to your boyfriend's "ex" is accomplished by a petition with the court to reduce the monthly amount or even stop it. The way to go about doing such is to file a notice of motion, declaration and memorandum of points and authorities along with an updated income and expense statement.

I suggest he consult with a family law attorney to assist him in the endeavor. If he cannot afford one, then he can go to the local legal aid clinic for help. Another option is to call the county bar association to see if there is a program to assist him. If there is a local law school, the law school may have a program to assist your boyfriend concerning his matter.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption