Can alandlord move in with you?

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Can alandlord move in with you?

I leased a house in 06/10(1 year lease). It stated in the lease that it would be a roommate situation and I would have input on who moves in. E-mails leading up to the lease stated the landlord would stay at my house once ever 6 weeks for a couple days to tend to other properties. He now has quit his job, been at my house for the last 3 weeks, and now says that he’s moving into my house. He has been here for approximately 6 weeks total since June. Nobody wants to live with their landlord, and I certainly don’t. I need to know if this is legal and what I can do to resolve this problem I am having.

Asked on October 14, 2010 under Real Estate Law, Michigan

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

A lease is a contract; if it states unequivocally, with no limitations or exceptions, that you would have the right to determine who moves in or to veto someone, then you can enforce that term. However, you need to consider what exactly the term is; for example, if merely says you'd be "consulted" or have "input" without giving you a right to say "no," then it may be that the landlord can disregard your wishes. And if it says that the landlord gets the final approval or ok, or makes the final determination, regardless of your opinion, then it would seem clear that the landlord does not need to take your wishes into account. So the first thing to do is read the language of the lease VERY carefully...you have those rights the lease gives you, but also only those rights. Good luck.


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