my landlord didnt ask for a deposit when we moved in and now they are harrassing us for a deposit and sent us a new lease with a deposit amount.

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my landlord didnt ask for a deposit when we moved in and now they are harrassing us for a deposit and sent us a new lease with a deposit amount.

our landlord is harrassing us to pay a deposit after we have already moved into the house. there are many problems with this house they are continuosly putting 3 day pay or quit notices on our door. what are we suppose to do. we were not asked for a deposit to move in and we have been living here since jan 09 and we continue to pay our rent on time every month.

Asked on June 7, 2009 under Real Estate Law, California

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 12 years ago | Contributor

There are a few things in your question that need clarification.  First, do you have a lease?  When did it start?  When does it end?  Doesthis "new" lease have the same terms and conditions but just adds the deposit?  Are you paying on the first of every month and promptly?  When are they posting the 3 day notices?  You need to seek out someone who can help to negotiate a resolution with your landlord.  If the "problems" you mention are conditions that the landlord is responsible to correct then he/she needs to be held accountable for them.  The deposit you mention is I bet a security deposit he/she forgot to ask for when you signed the lease to protect him/her from your damage to the apartment during your tenancy.  He.she can not force you to sign a new lease.  But living under these conditions can not be easy and you should seek help to resolve them amicably with your landlord. 

 


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