If my husband’s home based business failed, can my be son denied service from a phone company to whom the business owes money?

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If my husband’s home based business failed, can my be son denied service from a phone company to whom the business owes money?

My son was told he could not get service because of the outstanding balance owed by the company even though he has nothing to do with this company. My son does not have an account with the phone company, however, they informed him of the outstanding debt from the failed business listed at our address. Was the company allowed to disclose personal business to my son regarding the outstanding bill from my husband’s company? Also, can they deny my son service because the failed business has an outstanding debt?

Asked on October 29, 2010 under Bankruptcy Law, Pennsylvania

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

The disclosure by the company is definitely questionable.  If it was disclosed in an effort to collect a debt then it could have violated the Federal Debt Collections Practices Act.  It certainly seems like it was some form of invasion of privacy but more facts would be needed to determine same.  What the company is attempting to do is to prevent fraud in the procurement of services.  The address has with it a red flag on their books.  Coupled with the same last name it appears from their end that something fishy is going on. I would suggest that you in some way try and clear up the debt by entering in to a payment plan so that your son and you can obtain service again.  And you can contact your state attorney general for more information and help here.  Good luck. 


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