What to do if my husband just past away but our baby is an American citizen and I have fild for a 1751?

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What to do if my husband just past away but our baby is an American citizen and I have fild for a 1751?

I got my green card almost 2 years ago and I just had to file for the Removal Of Condition ( I751). My American husband, just past away; our son is 2 years old and he is an american citizen also. I am wondering if there is anyway that I might get denied for I751? He just past away, and I didn’t really had a chance to prepare everything for the form like I wanted for the proof of our marriage. I only included (baby’s birth certificate, car insurance in both’s names, lease agreement in both’s names, death certificate, 2 letters from 2 people, 1 joint account). Is that is enough to get approved?

Asked on May 3, 2012 under Immigration Law, Florida

Answers:

SB, Member, California / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

I am sorry to hear about the loss of your husband.  YOu should be fine to proceed with the I-751 on your own.  You should try to include as much documentation about your joint life together as you can.  Try to get bank accounts, credit card statements, utilities and other bills in both names, tax returns in both names for the past 2 years, cell phone statements, etc., in addition to the documents you already noted. 


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