my husband is an alcoholic and has become verbally abusive. Everything is my fault and threatens to leave all ways. is this grounds for divorce?

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my husband is an alcoholic and has become verbally abusive. Everything is my fault and threatens to leave all ways. is this grounds for divorce?

Asked on May 17, 2009 under Family Law, Texas

Answers:

B. B., Member, New Jersey Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

From a brief review of the Texas divorce law on the internet, it looks like this might be grounds for divorce, either on a "no fault" finding that there is "discord or conflict of personalities," or for cruelty.  There can be differences in how the grounds you choose affect the rest of the case.  I'm not a Texas lawyer, and the details of your case often matter quite a bit, so you should talk to an attorney in your area.  One place to find a local divorce lawyer is our website, http://attorneypages.com

J.M.A., Member in Good Standing of the Connecticut Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

There is no such thing as grounds for divorce.  If you are not happy with your marriage and would feel safer and happier without your husband in your life, then you should make that decision to leave him.  However, you should first try to exhaust every resource first, such as AA meetings and so forth.  If that is not working and you are truly unhappy, then you should go see a lawyer to serve him with papers.  If he threatens to leave you, then he shouldnt be that upset.  i would speak toa lawyer asap and start arranging for a divorce if you believe there is no way to reconcile the mariage and he rfuses to seek help/acknowledge his problem.


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