What to do about getting compensation for labor provided?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

What to do about getting compensation for labor provided?

My husband and I were recently renting a place with an option for contract for deed after a year. While renting the roof needed repair. The landlord supplied the materials, but as for labor of fixing the roof he provided himself and his “kids” and my husband and his father. Towards the end of the “lease” the landlord told us that $600 earned from my husband and his father’s labor would be put as a down payment. As things worked out, the landlord decided not to sell, and the rent would increase but the $600 owed would be split in half and go towards rent for the next two months. After he told us this, we gave our 30 day notice to evacuate the place. We told him that the $600 is still owed to us for the labor, he said that it was only for a down payment if we bought the place. Are we entitled to the $600?

Asked on October 14, 2012 under Real Estate Law, South Dakota

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

Fro what you have written the former landlord is obligated to your husband for $600 in labor provided for the roof repair regardless of the down payment issues. I would write the former landlord a letter demanding payment by a set date. Keep a copy of the letter for future use and need.

If the due date comes and goes without payment, your legal recourse seems to be small claims court.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption