How much can a tenant be charged for a damaged carpet if there was some damage that was pre-exisitng?

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How much can a tenant be charged for a damaged carpet if there was some damage that was pre-exisitng?

My husband and I moved into an apartment and filled out a damage form. We found there was damages done to the carpet and a few other things. Due to the carpet being frayed around the bathroom door, bedroom door and were the carpet meets the kitchen tile. My cats had a free for all and tore up the edges. We just moved out and now the apartment complex is trying to make us pay $1,200 for replacement carpet. We told them we understand the problem and we would be glad to pay for half the damage because had they fixed the carpet in the first place the cats would not have done more damage; now they are saying they have no damage form and they will be sending the bill to collections.

Asked on October 17, 2012 under Real Estate Law, Kentucky

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Under the laws of all states in this country assuming your pets damaged the carpet then you would be liable for paying the fair market value if the carpet in its depreciated condition. The landlord does not get the costs of a brand new carpet. Ordinarily, carpet is depreciated over a seven (7) year time period.

You would be responsible for the costs of the carpet at its fair market value when damaged.


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