When is a codicil an option?

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When is a codicil an option?

My husband and I had our Wills drawn up by an attorney 17 years ago. Since that time we have had 2 more children (now ages19 and 16, plus our 19 year old), have moved to another state, and the one house we now own is in a third state. In addition to changes that need to be made to reflect these circumstances, we also need to change the executor of our Wills as the current executor, my father-in-law, is having health issues that would make him unsuitable for this role. Lastly, we would like to change the guardians of our youngest child. After calling a couple of local law offices for estimates, it is clear that we can’t afford the cost to have a new Will drawn up. With this many changes to be made, would a codicil still be a viable option for us?

Asked on February 23, 2014 under Estate Planning, Connecticut

Answers:

Nathan Wagner / Law Office of Nathan Wagner

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

Yes, a codicil is an option in the sense that it can be used to make the changes you are describing. However, it is not likely to be less expensive than creating a new will. It is usually simpler to create a new will than to make sure that a new codicil is coordinated with a 17-year-old will. The only sure way to answer your question is to call local estate planning lawyers and ask them how much they would charge to create a codicil to modify your old will.  


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