What is the law regarding the return of a tilte that was mistakenly sent to my by the deakership?

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What is the law regarding the return of a tilte that was mistakenly sent to my by the deakership?

My husband and I bought a pick up truck 8 months ago, got financed, made our payments on time and recently received a letter from the finance company saying. “Thank you for paying off your vehicle”. I know I did not pay it off it’s a 6 year loan, so I called the comany to find out what is going on. They said that the place where we purchased the vehicle from paid it off and assumed that we traded in the truck. I told them that I was sitting in the truck at work as we spoke. They said they would look into it and to continue to make my payments. So being vigilant, I called the dealership that paid it off and they said they wrote the wrong account number on the check so I would be receiving the title with “No lien” on it. The dealership then stated that I needed to send the title back to them. Well today I received the title with “no lien”. Do I have to return the title? They were never the lienholder and legally do I have to keep making my payments. Could the bank come after us even though we hold the title to the truck?

Asked on October 1, 2012 under Bankruptcy Law, Florida

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

Under the laws of all states in this country if you still owe money of the vehicle that you purchased which you are paying over time on and the auto dealership mistakenly sent you vehicle registration to you stating no lien, then you need to return it to the sender.

If you do not, you could very well find yourself in a lawsuit. The mailing was in error. You still owe money on the vehicle.


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