What can I do if my husband and I are currently going through a divorce and he will no longer support me?

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What can I do if my husband and I are currently going through a divorce and he will no longer support me?

There have been many discussions about money as I was displaced when we separated and have no home or income. He assured me many times that he would continue support until I was able to find work and that it wasn’t necessary for me to worry about alimony information on the divorce paperwork. The paperwork was filed 5 months ago. Now he informed me that he will no longer support me. Do I have any legal options?

Asked on January 15, 2016 under Family Law, California

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 5 years ago | Contributor

Speak to a family law or divorce attorney: it may be possible you to file a motion in court, in the context of a divorce filing, seeking "emergent" (think: "urgent" or "emergency") relief in the form of a court order directing your husband to provide certain sums to you, or pay certain bills/expenses on your behalf, pending your divorce. Courts have the power to issue order, often called "injuntions," to maintain the "status quo"--i.e. to keep you supported, at least at a basic level, since previously your husband had been evidently supporting you--until the matter is resolved. (He may, though, later get a credit for some or all of those payments in terms of adjusting asset distribution or support.) 
It would be better to have an attorney help you: filing this sort of relief can be procedurally tricky. If you can't afford a lawyer, try contacting Legal Services--they may be able to help. If they can't, try contacting local law schools: some have "clinics" in family law where law students, under a professor's guidance or oversight, provide assistance.


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