If my home is called a “ccondominium unit” even though it is a2story single family home, can I officially remove the designation of ccondominium?

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If my home is called a “ccondominium unit” even though it is a2story single family home, can I officially remove the designation of ccondominium?

I bought a home from a builder and I didn’t know it is considered a condominium until I attended for closing. Can I change it from a condominum to as a regular single familly home? Builder never mentioned it and told me that nothing is common.

Asked on December 9, 2011 under Real Estate Law, Michigan

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Typically the term "condominium" is used when a unit smaller than 1,500 square feet is part of a planned unit development which is part of a homeowners association (HOA). If your home falls within the above criteria, it is technically a condominium.

The term "condominium" is also a term of art in the real estate realm. If you do not want to use the term "condominium" then I would not use it. However, if your unit is actually part of a HOA and a master development with condominiums, it will continue to be referred to as a "condominium".


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