If my former employer is using my old company e-mail address and sending e-mails in my name, is he violating any laws?

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If my former employer is using my old company e-mail address and sending e-mails in my name, is he violating any laws?

I accidentally overpaid myself on 2 occasions.  However, since my employer owed  me money, I didn’t say anything.  I have since left the company. I have learned that my former employer has been answering e-mails in my name and sending the following to people who e-mail me: “Why? because every person whom I come in contact with I seem to want to take advantage of or steal from them. I betrayed everyone I know, including my father. I am a 2-time convicted felon and it’s just a matter of time before strike three. I do not understand the words loyalty, honesty, integrity and I have no self worth.” And then putting my name at bottom of the e-mail. This former employer owes me over $100,000 in non-paid wages and overtime.

Asked on April 1, 2011 under Personal Injury, Texas

Answers:

MD, Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

You need to immediately contact a lawyer and the police. Immediately. This person is impersonating you and libeling you all at the same time. If what he wrote is factually incorrect, you do not even have to prove damage to your reputation. Under many state laws (which are constantly evolving), what he did was essentially steal your identity. If this person owes you more than $100,000.00, you need to show proof that he owes you based on contracts or employment hiring letter. Contact your lawyer first and together you should contact the police. At some point the Department of Labor may be involved, as well.


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