If my father founded companies in my name and has me listed as his human resources director and has me work under a fake name, is any of this legal?

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If my father founded companies in my name and has me listed as his human resources director and has me work under a fake name, is any of this legal?

My father owns a computer consulting company; I am 20 years old. He has founded companies in my nam, and has me listed as the “human resources director” both done without my knowledge or consent. He also forces me to work under a fake name and sign a fake signature on my timesheet. He has refused to pay me the thousands of dollars that he owes me for the time I’ve worked for him.

Asked on June 22, 2012 under Employment Labor Law, Texas

Answers:

B.H.F., Member, Texas State Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Using someone else's identity to "harm or defraud" is not legal.  Failing to pay an employee for work that they performed is not legal.  Using someone else's name to set up some type of shell corporation in their name withouth their consent is not legal-- it is a fraudulent use of their identifying information.  Essentially, not much of anything you describe in your question is legal.  You mention that your dad "forces you" to participate in some of these activities.  If your dad is ever exposed, he could drag you into serious criminal or civil trouble.  He could also create issues for you with the feds if this scheme was set up to defraud the IRS out of taxes.  Even though your only 20, you are considered an adult and could be held liable if you continue to participate.  You need to either pull out of the operation completely or demand that he start operating on the "up and up".  Considering that it seems like your dad has been doing this for a while, you would probably be safer pursuing an independent career path. 


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