If my ex used my credit cards without authorization, can I dispute all the transactions with my bank?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

If my ex used my credit cards without authorization, can I dispute all the transactions with my bank?

For the last 3 months she spent an average of $6000. She only has written authorization from me to use $550. She also has text messages from me demanding to pay back, but nothing explicit from me that I authorize the use of cards (i.e. What card did you used for the electric bill?). Am I going to be legally held for the whole amount, and how long do I have to dispute transactions?

Asked on December 10, 2010 under Bankruptcy Law, Texas

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

You say she only had written authorization for $550--what does that mean? If she had her own card on your account which was limited to $550, but the credit card issuer mistakenly allowed her to charge more than that, the credit card company should be responsible for amounts over $550--they violated the terms of the card. However, if there was no limit built into the card she used and it was simply that there was an agreement between the two of you that she could only charge up to $550, then you are liable for her charges--you cannot hold the credit card company or the vendors she charged from to a private agreement between you and your ex; as far as they were concerned, the charges were legal--though you can then in turn sue her for breach of the agreement and/or some form of theft to recover the amounts over $550. In the meantime, cancel this card so she can't keep using it.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption