If my ex hasn’t worked since before our divorce and I’ve been paying him $1800 a month for the last 13 years, can I get these payments reduced or eliminated?

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If my ex hasn’t worked since before our divorce and I’ve been paying him $1800 a month for the last 13 years, can I get these payments reduced or eliminated?

I was divorced 13 years ago. I was ordered to pay him $1800 per month and have been for the past 13 years. He is not disabled but refuses to work. Within a year of our divorce I got guardianship of my, then infant, grandson. I am not receiving any Social Security for the child.

Asked on August 29, 2018 under Family Law, Ohio

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

There are many components to this question and many facts that need clarifying in order to help.  I will try and give you some basic advice as to the law in your state but I strongly suggest you call you local bar association and ask if they have an attorney referral service.  I suggest that you go for an initial consultation but that you find a lawyer willing to help you on an "as needed" basis - consultation only, where perhaps you can do the heavly lifting yourself. 
Spousal support in Ohio can be terminated upon the following grounds: remarriage, cohabitation, change in circumstances and death. You must make an application to the court for termination.  It does not happen automatically. You could try for a chanmge in circumstances and see if the facts of your case fit in to any case law in your state.  As for the SS for your grandson, you should consult your local SS office.  It is unclear here how this fits in.  Good luck.


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