What are my rights if my employer tells my abuser if I am at work?

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What are my rights if my employer tells my abuser if I am at work?

I am currently staying at a domestic violence shelter and have had to take a leave of absence from work. My employer definitely makes it unsafe for me to work there. She tells my abuser where I amif he comes inside for me. She tells me I can’t keep hiding. I have to come to work come to work, to get my checks, but I have a woman with me from the shelter. My employer claims if I can come to work to get my checks then I can work. I can’t do that if she keeps tell my abuser where I am at. I am in fear for my life. What can I do?

Asked on May 7, 2011 under Employment Labor Law, Michigan

Answers:

MD, Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

You can have legal aid pay your employer a visit and explain that the next time this occurs, she will be sued for placing you in danger. You can contact the police department and have the domestic violence unit detective help her understand that if she continues to do that, she could be charged with obstructing justice possibly or aiding and abetting a possible domestic violence criminal. At this point, if you haven't filed charges you may need to. If your employer still won't help, you should consider talking to someone about whether her actions are tantamount to constructive termination and you might qualify for unemployment. If you need to get a temporary restraining order, then do so, because you might be able to get it so she doesn't keep spilling the fact you are there.


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