What to do if my employer of 13 months fired me after I told the other co-owner (also his girlfriend) about his and other employees drug use, during work days?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

What to do if my employer of 13 months fired me after I told the other co-owner (also his girlfriend) about his and other employees drug use, during work days?

The morning after I “blew the whistle” on him, he fired me in the presence of the only other employee who had worked there longer than myself. He told me the reason (word for word) for my dismissal was for the “drama” I created the day before! That employee is willing to witness on my behalf. I am receiving unemployment benefits even though he contested me. The NCESC sided on my behalf due to his inconsistent and false statements in regards to my termination. This is a growing company with about 15 employees and does about one million dollars a year. Do I have a case?

Asked on December 30, 2012 under Employment Labor Law, North Carolina

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

First, North Carolina has no state whistleblower statute so you would need to rely on Federal Law.  

 

The Whistleblower Protection Act prohibits federal agencies from taking adverse personnel actions against federal employees who engage in whistleblowing activities.

An employee participates in protected activity by disclosing information that evidences: fraud; gross mismanagement; gross waste of funds; an abuse of authority; a violation of a law, rule or regulation conducted by the government; or a substantial and specific danger to public health or safety. 

 

It is unclear if what happened here qualifies under the act or law.  I would speak with ana ttorney in your area.  More facts are needed.  Good luck.

IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption