If my employer has a policy for expenses, can an employer through policy force an employee to risk their personal money for company expenses?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

If my employer has a policy for expenses, can an employer through policy force an employee to risk their personal money for company expenses?

All employees must use the company issued credit card. The employee is responsible for all expenses made on that card until expenses are approved. Charges made on the company card are processed into a “wallet”. The employee completes an expense account identifying the charges in the wallet, provides rational, then submits for approval. Once submitted, it must be approved by the supervisor and by travel analysis. If the supervisor or travel analysis rejects an expense, the employee must pay the charge. The employee puts personal money at risk for the employer until approved.

Asked on January 20, 2013 under Employment Labor Law, Minnesota

Answers:

Tricia Dwyer / Tricia Dwyer Esq & Associates PLLC

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

Hello.  I will provide an answer that is general in nature, because the specifics of your situation may well be distinct and depart from generalities.  Each business handles ‘incidental expenses’ (expenses incurred for certain business activities that are a part of daily work life) differently.  In general, a credit card may be used. Employees are to keep receipts and provide detailed documentation for all purchases. Often the employee handbook provides detailed policies about incidental expenses and there usually are limits on the sorts/kinds of incidental expenses the company will pay and ‘caps’ (upper limits) on costs and expenses. 

If you have concerns about your personal work situation then I recommend that you confer privately with an attorney who works in the area of employment law. I would confer with you in great detail about the situation and I would want to review any written documents that are related to your issues. I recommend you phone several attorneys in choosing which attorney you want to help you because it is very important that you feel a sense of great trust and safety with the attorney. Oftentimes a person will have multiple concerns about his/her workplace (bosses, supervisors, coworkers, policies, etc.) to discuss.  


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption