My daughter was arrested for marijauna at age 17 at ASU in 2004. She was never contacted by anyone about a court date.

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My daughter was arrested for marijauna at age 17 at ASU in 2004. She was never contacted by anyone about a court date.

She is now 22 and a college grad. She moved back to CA in 2005. She just found out that she has warrant for her arrest when a backgrounf check was done. She called to make a court date for this week. What can we expect when we go to court? She does not have $3500 to pay a lawyer

Asked on July 3, 2009 under Criminal Law, California

Answers:

B. B., Member, New Jersey Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

I'm not an Arizona attorney, and there are a number of other facts that would be very important. These start with how much marijuana she was caught with, and whether she has any other convictions on her record.  There also might be facts about the arrest that could be used to suppress the evidence, although that would probably be very difficult to get into at this late date.

She will almost certainly have to pay a fine and costs for failing to appear;  there is likely to be some discussion as to why that happened.  If she has no prior record, it should be possible for her to have some sort of alternate sentence that will keep her from having a criminal record, if the prosecutor still wants to go forward with the case.

B. B., Member, New Jersey Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

I'm not an Arizona attorney, and there are a number of other facts that would be very important. These start with how much marijuana she was caught with, and whether she has any other convictions on her record.  There also might be facts about the arrest that could be used to suppress the evidence, although that would probably be very difficult to get into at this late date.

She will almost certainly have to pay a fine and costs for failing to appear;  there is likely to be some discussion as to why that happened.  If she has no prior record, it should be possible for her to have some sort of alternate sentence that will keep her from having a criminal record, if the prosecutor still wants to go forward with the case.


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