My daughter’s friend reversed my daughter’s car and managed to hit two parked cars. Can I sue her parents for the damage of all three cars?

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My daughter’s friend reversed my daughter’s car and managed to hit two parked cars. Can I sue her parents for the damage of all three cars?

My 17-year old daughter let a good friend back her 2001 Honda Accord out of a parking space at a mall. The friend told my daughter she was really good at backing cars out, then proceeded to hit the car parked alongside her, didn’t put on brakes, continued backing up pushing the other vehicle, and then backed into the car parked behind her. Her so-called good friend damaged all three vehicles. The girl wasn’t even licensed! The police officer who investigated said the girl’s parents would be responsible for all damages, but now it seems they have hired an attorney. Should we get an attorney?

Asked on March 22, 2009 under Insurance Law, Alabama

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 12 years ago | Contributor

If the other 17 year old's parents have an attorney, it does not sound as if they are going to willingly pay for the repairs to your car or the cars of the people she backed into.

If  your insurance company does pay for repairs to the other cars, and/or if you had collision, and it pays for repairs to your car, it would likely go after her, her parents and/or their insurance company via subrogation. On the other hand, as the daughter's "friend" was not licensed, your company conceivably may deny all liability leaving you holding the entire bag -- your own damages and liability to the other cars' owners.

Sounds as if you would be better of paying an insurance or accident lawyer now for some advice rather than waiting for things to possibly get worse and far more costly.


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