What to do if my daughter lives in campus housing with 2 other roommates and another roommate is being placed in their apartment but she does drugs?

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What to do if my daughter lives in campus housing with 2 other roommates and another roommate is being placed in their apartment but she does drugs?

The girls have only met this new roommate once via an interview set-up by the property. After the interview, the girls found out via hearsay info from people who know the girl, that she does drugs and that her boyfriend deals drugs. The boyfriend was at interview also and has had roommate problems, so girls are concerned he may stay there also. He has history of arguing with girlfriend. My daughter was very upset and both she and I contacted the property manager and she doesn’t care. They are moving the girl in today. What is my recourse, if any, to protect my daughter?

Asked on January 19, 2013 under Real Estate Law, South Carolina

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

This is an issue for the police, if there are drugs being done or sold, and/or for the college (if this is campus housing under the control of the school). Your daughter should report this matter to both if there is evidence of criminal activity, so that way, there will be record that your daughter reported the crime, and did not participate in it.

There is no way for your  daughter  to herself either evict this roommate (since one tenant may not evict another) or to move out without being liable for rent for the rest of the lease term (since the obligation of a tenant to her landlord is not affected by the criminal actions of other people, even other tenants). This is a police or criminal justice issue, not a landlord-tenant issue.


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