What to do if my car was stolen and I filied my claim but now my insurer is giving me the runaround?

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What to do if my car was stolen and I filied my claim but now my insurer is giving me the runaround?

I have given a police report and spoke to the police on different occasions I have given a recorded interview to my insurance adjuster along with a signed written notarized statement. Now my insurance company is telling me I need to go in for a second interview with a insurance investigator. I feel im being given the run around as I have already given all the information I have to them. My insurance adjuster told me the claim will not be finalized until I meet the investigator for a second recorded interview. Should I meet with this investigator isnt all the information I have given enough to come up with a decision on my claim? The claim has been going on for more then a month and I believe my insurance company is in violation of unfair insurance practice law.

Asked on October 1, 2012 under Insurance Law, California

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

Insurers will not pay--and do not have to pay--if they believe that the claim is in some way false; for example, that you collaborated with someone to have the car stolen to place a claim. They can request additional information before deciding what to do. If  you don't cooperate or can't satisfy them that his is a legitimate claim, they won't pay. If they won't pay, however, when you believe that they should, you could sue them to force them to pay: the insurance policy is a contract, and so the insurer is bound by its terms. If they are not paying when, under the policy they should, you can take legal action to enforce the policy. A court will then decide what the  facts are and whether they should or should not pay.


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