My brother-in-law took out a lfe insurance policy on me. I received a 3rd party notice for pmt. on an insurance I know nothing about.

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My brother-in-law took out a lfe insurance policy on me. I received a 3rd party notice for pmt. on an insurance I know nothing about.

where do I start to stop this? How did he manage to get insurance on me without my knowledge? Do I have any rights rights in this matter? thank you

Asked on May 17, 2009 under Insurance Law, Texas

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

With the exception of policies relating to minors and employer/employees, I have never seen a policy that doesn't require the consent of the insured.  Consent is evidenced by the insured's signature.  That would mean physically signing a document or electronically doing so.  If the policy was issued than your question to your brother-in-law is, who signed? 

Most probably what happened here is that the insurance company wrote to you, as the insured, not your brother-in-law, as the owner, to inform of non-payment.  The notice should have gone to the owner but there was obviously an administrative error.  I personally have run into this situation.

What you need to do now is to request a copy of the policy from the insurance company.  It will be a no-exam policy which means that no physical exam of you, the insured, was required; however consent would still have been needed.  Without such consent, the policy is void.  You can inform the insurance company of this and they will cancel the policy.

There are also potential fraud, forgery issues and other matters, I just don't know how aggressive you want to be in pursuing all of your remedies.

 


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