My boyfriend got in trouble for stolen checks. His friend had implicated me. Do I need an attorney when talking to the police or is it ok to go alone

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My boyfriend got in trouble for stolen checks. His friend had implicated me. Do I need an attorney when talking to the police or is it ok to go alone

The friend had been the one instigating him to “get money, get money”. He told them i knew about all of it and I did not. I saw some checks being given from one person to another, but how do I know theyare stolen. Then he is saying that I know about stolen cars too. I had my suspicion that one was, but my boyfriend denied that it was. I live at home with my mom yet, and so i was not always around the two of them to know whlat they are doing. When my boyfriend lived somewhere else, things were good. It is the friends influence, pus my boyfirend does have OCD compulsions.

Asked on June 13, 2009 under Criminal Law, Pennsylvania

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

This is a criminal matter - do not speak to the police alone.  Whether or not you are innocent you could say something to inadvertently incriminate yourself.  Get legal representation and say nothing to the police until you do.  Chances are this can all be straightened out now but a lawyer will be the best one to do it for you.

There will be some cost involved but much more so down the line if you are facing charges.  Don't put yourself in a position in 6 months or a year from now where you'll think,  "Gee, I really should have had an attorney instead of going it alone".  At that point it will be too late.


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