Qhat to do if my boss and I were handing out marketing materials in a neighborhood and I was bitten by a property owner’s dog?

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Qhat to do if my boss and I were handing out marketing materials in a neighborhood and I was bitten by a property owner’s dog?

My boss and I were working handing out marketing materials in a neighborhood and I was bitten by a property owner’s dog. I went to a hospital, my wounds were treated and I was released with several Rx to take. The dog was up to date on shots and put on house arrest/quarantine for 10 days. The hospital has not sent a bill for the ER visit but I paid out of pocket for my prescriptions. I’m healing well and kept working regular schedule. If this happened during work, am I paid for time spent in the hospital? What is the appropriate process to get reimbursed and protect my rights/job? Who’s responsible?

Asked on May 30, 2012 under Personal Injury, Illinois

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

You may be able to submit a claim for worker's compensation, since you were injured during work. However, otherwise, your employer would not be liable, since your employer is not responsible for the actions of dogs owned by other people, and would therefore not have to pay either your medical bills or your wages for any time you were not actually working.

You could possibly hold the dog's owner liable, if he or she had some warning that the dog was viscious or dangerous (such as it had previously bitten other people).

Your best best may be to speak with your payroll or HR department about a worker's compensation claim, or else contacting your state department of labor directly.


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