If my A/C has not been fixed and because of it my electricity bill is extremely high, ismy landlord liable for any part of the bill?

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If my A/C has not been fixed and because of it my electricity bill is extremely high, ismy landlord liable for any part of the bill?

I have called and requested for someone to come fix my air for over two months now. I have even sent certified letter with my request in writing. The problem has not been fixed and my light bill has gone up drastically and I just flat out can’t afford it. I don’t feel that I should have to pay the whole bill because it is completely out of my control. I’m just not sure of what to do next.

Asked on August 3, 2011 Texas

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Many states have statutes that allow a tenant after making attempts to have the landlord to rectify the problem with the rented apartment to "repair the problem and deduct the cost of the repair" from the following month or month's rent check depending upon the cost of the repair.

Potentially your state has a similar statute and laws like the "repair and deduct" law in California. You have made attempts to have your landlord fix the air conditioning problem without success. You should send one more letter to your landlord advising him or her of the unresolved problem with the air conditioning unit, give a set deadline, and if not fixed, advise the landlord you will fix the problem and deduct the costs from your next rent check.

Conceivably your landlord is responsible for the excess electricity used due to not fixing the problem you have complained about. My suggestion helps resolve the problem.

Good luck.


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