Move-In Elevator and Staircase deposit for NYC Rental Apartment

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Move-In Elevator and Staircase deposit for NYC Rental Apartment

So I’m moving to a nice studio apartment in NYC and got a great deal (i usually can’t afford a place here). Unfortunately, I was told by my landlord to double check with the building’s management about move in fees since her form was outdated. I talked to the super and he told me I have to make a $500 Refundable deposit AS well as a $300 Non-refundable deposit to use the elevator or staircase. Is that really the norm? I was also told that I cannot move in ANYTHING without paying this. So no small boxes or small easy to carry items without paying AND informing them of move-in.

Asked on June 15, 2009 under Real Estate Law, New Jersey

Answers:

J.V., Member, New Jersey Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 12 years ago | Contributor

certain buildings in NYC have a set of rules that while they seem unconventional and even unfair are how that building operates. What I would advise you do is obtain a copy of the buildings by-laws and read through them. That will let you know the specifics as far as what the rules within that building are, fees, notice and all other out of the ordinary practices of the building.

If you still feel it is unfair you can speak to one of the people in charge of the building although they will probably say you have no choice as the building applies the rules to everyone. Of course if you want to be totally certain and don't feel confident in yourself reading the by-laws alone I advise hiring a local attorney who deals with these buildings all the time, they may know of the top f their head or after reading briefly they can assure you of the situation. good luck


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