Mother has Irrevocable Trust and wants me to sign a new Trust

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Mother has Irrevocable Trust and wants me to sign a new Trust

My stepfather passed a few months ago. My mother and stepfather, residents of California, had a revocable Trust that became irrevocable on his death. I have never read their Trust. She had her property and assets assessed after he passed and had her attorney write up a new Trust. She just emailed me to say she is sending me a signature page that she wants me sign and return to her and then she would have my brother sign it. As far as I know from never reading it, we are the only beneficiaries of the trust but I don’t really know the details. She stated that her new trust is very complicated and it is all about avoiding a 40% inheritance tax in CA when she dies. She mentioned her Trust was done 28 years ago and the laws were different then so her attorney is finding a way to change it. I’ve asked her before about the old Trust but she doesn’t want me to read it. Should I have an attorney review not only the signature page but request reading the entire trust and can I legally request this? Just as an FYI, we all 3 live in different states.

Asked on July 15, 2017 under Estate Planning, Florida

Answers:

S.L,. Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

You should request to see and read the entire Trust before signing. You may want to have an attorney review it and answer any questions you may have about the Trust.
You never want to sign a document without reading it and being familiar with it because if you sign without reading, you are bound by its contents which may include provisions that are adverse to your interests.


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