Ifour mobile home situated on family member’s land and now they want us to move it, how much time dowe have?

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Ifour mobile home situated on family member’s land and now they want us to move it, how much time dowe have?

My wife’s grandmother agreed to let us place our mobile home on some vacant land that he owned. We have been living here for over 6 years. Now, due to a family squabble, she is making us move it. This presents an extreme hardship for us and our children, but we are happy to do so ASAP. We have never been asked to pay rent, and have nothing on paper, just a verbal agreement. How much time do we have to move our trailer, and what are our rights in this situation?

Asked on December 29, 2010 under Real Estate Law, Louisiana

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

1) She has the right to make you relocate the home--it's her property, not yours, and in the absence of any agreement as to your rights (e.g. a lease), she can ask you to leave.

2) If you're not paying rent at all, she only has to give you a few day's notice--usually 3 - 5.

3) If you don't move after the notice period, she can then bring an eviction action and get an order that you must leave; this usually takes a few weeks, from start to finish.

There's no firm time line, since alot depends on how aggressively she pursues it, how booked up the courts are, etc., but 3 - 6 weeks is not uncommon, though it can take longer. You may wish to try to work out a timeline with her--e.g. agree to be out be a certain date. You could also offer to pay her some rent in exchange for more  time (or being able to stay there indefinitely).


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