Less than $900 a month a month in income & less then $5000 in debt can i claim bankruptcy?

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Less than $900 a month a month in income & less then $5000 in debt can i claim bankruptcy?

i recent was a victim of fraud off of craigs list. i was trying to sell something so that i could pay down my debt. but the check i was given was a fraudelent check and now i am deeper in debt. i have creditors that i tried to pay off with this check that are now demanding full payment. i dont owe more then $5000 dollars i think. But i am on social security disability and only get $838 amonth. but my rent is $550 a month. so paying off the debt is extremely hard and now even more hard. can i claim bankruptcy to help this situation.

Asked on June 19, 2009 under Bankruptcy Law, Washington

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

If your debts exceed your ability to repay, you can file for bankruptcy. If your income is only $900 a month and you're paying $550 a month just for rent, you only have $350 a month left--and that's for food, clothing, medical expenses, etc. You definitely seem like you would qualify for bankruptcy, and in most states, social security income is protected from bankruptcy. You should call your state bar association for a referral to an attorney or group that will provide free representation for people who do not have enough money to pay for a lawyer and discuss your situation with him or her.


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