Legality of recording an informal meeting of our building Tenant’s Association

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Legality of recording an informal meeting of our building Tenant’s Association

3 of us decided to have an informal meeting to discuss the possibility of one of those people becoming Vice President of the Association. This fella speaks very softly, and I have a hearing deficit. I turned my recorder on and threw it in my purse to record the meeting. I figured that way I could listen to it later in case I missed something. I few days later I told this gentleman about it, and he became angry and said that was against the law in MD. Am I in trouble?

Asked on December 3, 2017 under Personal Injury, Maryland

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

MD is what is known as an "all party consent" state. This means that all parties to a recorded conversation must give their permission to its being recorded. Without such permission, any recording is illegal. The exception to this are conversations being held in a public place. However, such a meeting as you describe would probably not be deemed to be in public. To be certain of your rights, you should consult directly with a local personal injury attorney.

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

You violated your state's wiretapping/recording laws and committed a crime. It doesn't matter if you had "nothing sinister in mind" or that it was only for your "personal use." Your state is what is called a "two-party consent" state, though the more correct term would be "all-party consent": in MD, *every* person in a conversation must consent, or agree, to be recorded or recording is illegal.


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