KY labor laws concerning time off, breaks, Etc.

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KY labor laws concerning time off, breaks, Etc.

I work in a small office with only my Director. Our office is open 9-4, Mon-Thurs; however, I have to be at the office at least 5 minutes early everyday to open and I cannot lock up until 4:00. I get no breaks and I have no set lunch. Most days I work as I eat and I have even been required to work overtime with no extra pay because I am a salaried employee. I have come to work very sick because my employer does not allow sick days. When I asked for 1 day off to help my mother who was having surgery, I was told I could have it but to make sure it doesn’t happen again. Our office closes for most Federal Holidays, a week for Thanksgiving, and a week for Christmas, but I am not allowed a vacation any other time. I would just like to know what rights I have as an employee in KY concerning time off, and breaks. Can you help?

Asked on May 21, 2009 under Employment Labor Law, Kentucky

Answers:

B. B., Member, New Jersey Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 12 years ago | Contributor

I'm not a Kentucky lawyer, but some research suggests that, like most states, you have some very detailed laws and administrative regulations on this subject.  You should be able to find a number for the Division of Employment Standards, Apprenticeship and Mediation in your telephone book, and they also have a website with more detailed information.

The state, or a lawyer, would need to know more about your job to give you a detailed understanding of your rights, and I encourage you to go for it.  If you want to find a qualified employment lawyer in your area, one place to look is our website, http://attorneypages.com


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