IfI pay off a judgment for the cost ofmaterials that were ordered and fabricated, don’t I now have a right to the goods?

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IfI pay off a judgment for the cost ofmaterials that were ordered and fabricated, don’t I now have a right to the goods?

I recently had a contractor install laminate flooring for me and I was not happy with the results. Prior to him completing that work, I asked him to also make custom thresholds for the doorways. After seeing his work I told him not to bother with the thresholds. He sued me and won a judgement for $257, plus court fees of $58. I contacted him to pay him and get the thresholds. He now tells me that he doesn’t have to furnish the goods since he won the judgement against me. Is he correct? That was not my understanding when we left the courthouse.

Asked on August 9, 2011 Virginia

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

You need to read what the written and entered judgment issued by the court against you states. Its terms set forth what the parties to the litigation are obligated to do as the end result.

If the written and entered judgment gives the former contractor a dollar judgment against you and states nothing about providing the thresholds to you, then you do not get the threshholds.

In all likelihood if the judge followed the law, the $257.00 dollar amount judgment most likely represents the "net profit" loss of the contractor from the stoppage of work on your agreement to do such even though the contractor did not actually fabricate the items.

It seems that the contractor is correct in his assessment of the judgment against you.

Good question.

 

 


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