Is there anything I can legally do to get a landlord to get the right info to the electric company?

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Is there anything I can legally do to get a landlord to get the right info to the electric company?

I moved out of an apt and setup a disconnection service with the electric company. There is proof of that, for some reason it didn’t go through. Now they are saying I owe $1100 from an apartment I wasn’t living in. The landlord stated she lost the info for whoever lived in there after me. I feel like there wasn’t anyone in there for a while and she doesn’t want to pay it. It is an easy fix but she refuses to look for the correct renters. Also, every file, document, what-have-you they do is done by hand, nothing is on a computer.

Asked on April 27, 2012 under Real Estate Law, Minnesota

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

The best way for you to try and resolve the electrical issue that you are involved in is to write a letter to the electric company and the former landlord together explaining the situation and the former landlord's refusal to provide the names of the tenants who occupied your former rental during the period where the $1,100 was incurred.

Keep a copy of the letter for future use and need. In the letter mention that it is the former landlord's obligation to pay the $1,100 bill. The above will assist in putting pressure on the former landlord to give you the information that you need and have written about.


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