Is there a way to dispute my student loan liabilitywith the government if the school I attended was shut down?

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Is there a way to dispute my student loan liabilitywith the government if the school I attended was shut down?

About 14 years ago I got student loans and went to a business computer training institute. A while after that the school closed down and there was a class action lawsuit against them. They went bankrupt and lost the lawsuit. I don’t believe that I should have to pay back my student loans. The school was a scam and it was proved. What can I do? The government is now coming after my paychecks. How can I dispute this and get rid of the whole thing?

Asked on September 24, 2010 under Bankruptcy Law, Oregon

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

You applied for the student loan, correct?  It was a contract made between you and the government for a loan for school.  Was the loan paid directly to you? Did you pay the school?  Did you everdo anything to participate in regaining the money back when the school closed down, like the class action lawsuit?  Did you recover tuition money (which would have been loan money)?  All these questions are posed to help you think toward a resolution of the matter from both sides of the fence: your and the government.  I strongly suspect that you signed the loan documents and they gave you the money to do as you see fit.  And I strongly suspect that you are liable for the funds regardless of the institution going bankrupt. So go and make a deal soon.  Good luck.


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