Is there a minimum time limit before a divorce trial that a person can be served a subpoena?

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Is there a minimum time limit before a divorce trial that a person can be served a subpoena?

Divorce has been on file since 12/09. There are no assets/money to speak of. She wants is spousal support for the rest of her life. I have met another woman, currently living together, and they are trying to serve her. She has nothing to do with my divorce. Wife is being very vindictive/greedy type and all I want is get on with my life (we are in our early 60’s). This finalization has been put off many times over the past year and I have had to change attorneys; a nightmare to say the least. Trial is in 2 days.

Asked on December 19, 2010 under Family Law, Texas

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

I am sorry for your situation.  But sometimes when people are hurt they become more vicious and vindictive than one could ever dream of.  And it appears that your wife is hurt here. 

It is my understanding that spousal support is indeed an option for courts to order in Texas. They consider such facts as the duration of the marriage the needs of the party requesting support, what the finances and liabilities of each party are, efforts of the party requesting support to work and be self-supporting, etc.  But support is generally limited to three years. There are exceptions but I do not think that they would apply here. Support payments are limited to the lesser of $2500 per month or 20 percent of the paying spouse's average income per month.   


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