Is there a limit on how long it can take for maintenance to fix something?

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Is there a limit on how long it can take for maintenance to fix something?

I recently moved in and put in a request to rehang a closet door, after about 2 weeks, the guy removed the door, and in the process, bruised his thumb, and left, leave all his tools, a mess and a door on the floor. I was left to put everything away in the office, and have since, had a door off the frame, for over a month and a half with nothing, he has been back and working since a few days after hurting himself. I also have a leaking kitchen sink, broken stove top burner, and recaulking they agreed to due before I moved in. Is it legal for them to leave all these things as they are?

Asked on September 18, 2011 under Real Estate Law, Washington

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Typically in all landlord tenant situations there is a reasonable time period for maintenance to make the necessary repairs depending upon the scope of the work needed to be done and the complexity of the work.

In your matter, you were dealt an unfortunate situation where the maintenance person doing the work on your rental injured himself or herself and as a result there has been a delay in getting the work completed.

You need to contact your landlord or the property manager concerning the delay in getting the work completed in a timely fashion and your dissatisfaction. Follow up the telephone call with a written letter suggesting that another maintenance person be brought in to get the job completed.

There is nothing illegal for a maintance person to leave tools at your rental during the work in process.

Good luck.


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