Is there a law called a 2 point reduction?

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Is there a law called a 2 point reduction?

I have been told that there is a law called a 2-point deduction for first time federal drug charges. Do you know about this law and could you explain it to me if there is such a thing?

Asked on November 8, 2018 under Criminal Law, Tennessee

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

The “Drugs Minus Two” law reduces the base offense level by 2 points (or 2 levels) in most federal drug cases with regard to minimum sentencing guidelines. This means that a person’s federal sentencing guidelines will be calculated with the benefit of these reduced offense levels for the drug quantities involved in the case. It should be noted, however, that the drug quantity table still has a minimum base offense level of 6 and a maximumbase offense level of 38. It affects inmates whose guideline sentence was based on some quantity of any controlled substance. This means that if the inmate’s sentence was based on the guideline quantity calculation instead of the statutory mandatory minimum, then it may lower the inmate’s guideline range.
As this can all get a bit complicated, you should consult directly with an attorney if possible, as they can best advise you further. 


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