Is there anywaya 15 year old can get emancipated?

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Is there anywaya 15 year old can get emancipated?

I live in ME.

Asked on December 7, 2011 under Family Law, Maine

Answers:

L.P., Member, Pennsylvania and New Jersey Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Thank you forsubmitting your question regarding the law of emancipation of minors in Maine.  As you may be aware, laws for the emancipation of minors will vary from state to state.  This does not mean that you can escape the age limit by traveling to another state to benefit from the laws of the less restrictive state.  Many states require that you be a resident of their state, and the term “residency” may be defined by each individual state.

That being said, in Maine, the emancipation of a minor refers to the legal process where the District Court in Maine would declare a minor of sixteen years of age or older completely independent of their parents or legal guardians.  Once emancipated, your parents no longer have the legal authority to have control over your life, and under the law, you will be treated as an adult.  The one exception to the minimum age requirement of sixteen years old, seems to be if a minor gets married.  If you are fifteen years old and get married, then you are considered emancipated.  However, in order to get married if you are younger than eighteen years old, you need your parent or legal guardian’s permission. 

However, once you turn sixteen years old you can ask that the court appoint you a free lawyer.  This lawyer will assist you with the petition to the court for emancipation.  The lawyer will also explain to you the additional responsibilities that you will take on as being held legally responsible for yourself.

 


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