Is sending unsolicited mail to a business, but not for advertising, allowed?

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Is sending unsolicited mail to a business, but not for advertising, allowed?

I run a small business that performs IT related work. While working for one of

our clients we noticed a neighboring business had a Wi-Fi network with an

outdated security protocol WEP. Note we didn’t do anything to their network,

this shows up when you see the list of available Wi-Fi networks. I would like to

send them a letter in the mail just to let them know how insecure it is with some

pamphlets with information on small business best practices for information

security. I would also include some instructions on how to change it themselves if they choose. I would make it clear to them that this is just one small business trying to help another small business and not trying to make a sale to them. Data breaches hurt everyone, so I just want to be helpful where I can.

Asked on November 25, 2018 under Business Law, New York

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

Sending unsolicitated advertisements and most other mail is legal. Think about all of the mail that you receive on a daily basis. If sending such mail was illegal our mailbozes would be empty. 

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

What you suggest is perfectly legal. Indeed, you could even send them an unsolicited advertisement for your services, and that would be legal, too. If you are like me, you probably get multiple unsolicited advertisements for business services--there's no reason you can't send them one, too.


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