Arenasty emails and text messagesconsidered harassment?

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Arenasty emails and text messagesconsidered harassment?

My ex and I have a very whacked situation we still live in the same house’ he lives in an apartment in the basement. I am getting scared of him. When I do not conform to what h wants I start getting these nasty emails or texts saying I am an a drug addict, I am unfit, I deserve to die and leave my children to my parents because they would be better off with out me. I have saved them but what can I do legally? I need help he has me to the point of emotional distress. I was forced by him to sign off on alimony and I am on disability.

Asked on August 20, 2011 Massachusetts

Answers:

Stan Helinski / McKinley Law Group

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

You've got a couple/few situations, but there is something short of a restraining order in Massachusetts called a "Harrassment Order," which you may be interested in obtaining.  

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

If the texts and e mails you are receiving form your former husband are upsetting to you where you do not want any further contact from him because of the message's content, then you are being harassed.

Objectively the messages would meet the standard of harassment based upon the content that you have written about within your question. There is no socially redeeming content in the messages he sent you that you wrote about.

You need to consult with an attorney about the situation that you are in. My first thoughts are that you should consider obtaing a restraining order prohibiting all texting, e mails and other contact by your former husband with you.


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