is my employer legally obligated to pay me without having my ssn and birth certificate on file, on time.

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is my employer legally obligated to pay me without having my ssn and birth certificate on file, on time.

I have been working for a spa/resort and they pay per room on room cleans and
hourly spa area cleaning, laundry, and other duties. They normally have been
giving everyone a written check until now they are switching over to a more
professional electronic manner it would seem. Although they require to have a
social security card, birth certificate, drivers license I think its 2 forms of
id including a DL. Anyways i am unable to get all these documents on time in
order to have them pay me how they want to on time. are they still legally
obligated to make sure I am paid on time like everyone else? I am not the only
one experiencing this issue.

Asked on April 20, 2017 under Employment Labor Law, Utah

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

An employer needs to see an employee's social security card in order to enter your wages into their accounting system for tax reporting purposes, etc. That having been said, while your pay could be held up because of this, you would be entitled to all back earned but unpaid wages once such documentation is provided. 

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

No, they are allowed to require a SSN (or TIN--taxpayer identification number) before paying you, and in fact, should not be employing you if you do not have one or the other. They are allowed to see identification to prove you are who you say you are. It is your obligation to provide these things. Once you do, they will have to pay you any back wages accrued while you were providing the documentation.


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