How can I legally get rid of ignition interlock device?

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How can I legally get rid of ignition interlock device?

The court had suspended my license for 1 year and I do not have to report to a probation officer. I already went to sign up for DDP classes and got a conditional license. The ignition interlock device is a hassle and I can live without driving for a year. Therefore, I am seeking advice in how to legally get rid of the device. I want to know if it possible to transfer the title of the car to my son? He lives in the same household as me. If it is not possible to transfer it in the same household, can I sell off the car?

Asked on December 15, 2010 under Criminal Law, New York

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

The concern with those convicted of drunk driving and then given a conditional licence is obvious and the need to repeat it here unnecessary.  The protection is for the masses and when weighed against the inconvenience of the offender, well, the scale tips heavily in favor of the masses.  It is difficult here not knowing the conditions of probation imposed.  But I would venture to guess that the condition of the device was imposed because of the conditional license grant.  So I would think that the first step would be to surrender your conditional license.  Then there is the issue of ownership.  Transferring the ownership to a household member will be seen for what it is: an attempt to try and find a loophole but I do not think that it will fly.  Selling the car entirely may be the way to go.  Then you will have no temptation. 


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