Is it possible for me to get emancipated at 17 without parent consent?

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Is it possible for me to get emancipated at 17 without parent consent?

I’m 17 and living with 5 members of my family. My mother has no job and we are living off of my grandmother. My mother’s boyfriend threatens her and is on meth. I’m constantly having to help take care of my younger siblings. I’m the oldest child in my house and I’m sick of living there. We have no money, our house is a mess, and I’m stuck there not being able to socialize with my friends. I’m pretty much not allowed to go anywhere. I don’t have a job but anywhere I want to apply my mom won’t let me. My boyfriend is trying to get me out so I can live a happy life.

Asked on April 19, 2012 under Family Law, Kansas

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

I am so sorry for your situation.  First about emancipation.  You generally do not need parental consent to become emancipated but the process takes a long time so if you are close to 18 - legal emancipation - then you may want to wait until then.  To become emanciapted you need to sow the court that you can take care of yourself. You need a "plan" so to speak, showing you have a means to support yourself, a place to live and even in some states health insurance. I nkow it must be difficult to have so much responsibility but your siblings are very lucky to have you to look up to here.  Is it possible to get help for your Mom?  She appears to fall under the battered woman heading and if you get help for her it will ultimately help all of you.  Ask an adult you trust for help too, possibly to get a restraining order against the boyfriend. Good luck to you all.


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